Tokyo has been the capital of Japan since 1869 and is now the worlds most populous metropolis. There is so much to see and do in this vibrant city such as  visiting the famous Shibuya Crossing, exploring Sēnso-Ji, the oldest buddhist temple in Tokyo, and admiring the view of the stunning skyline from the observation deck at Tokyo Skytree.

Streets of Tokyo

Visit Shibuya for the famous Shibuya crossing, which is the busiest intersection in the world.

Shibuya

In Shibuya, music shops, cheap apparel, restaurants, and arcades are abundant.

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Piss Alley

Omoide Yokocho “Memory Lane” is located just outside Shinjuku Station and comprises several small bars, yakitoro grills and food stalls.

Piss Alley

It’s nickname as “Piss Alley” came from the post Word War 2 days, which tells a story all of its own.

Sensō-ji Temple

Sensō-ji, the oldest temple in Tokyo located in Asakusa, was founded in 645AD. The temple is just a five minute walk from Asakusa Station and is open from 6am-5pm in the summer (Apr-Sep) and 6.30am-5pm in the winter months (Oct-Mar).

Sensō-ji Temple

It’s entrance path is lined with hundreds of stalls selling traditional gifts and local foods to thousands of visitors.

Sensō-ji Temple

Buddhism is one of the main religions in Japan and Buddhist temples have become an important part of the Tokyo landscape.

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Shinjuku Gyoen

Shinjuku Gyoen is a large park and garden in Shinjuku and Shibuya, which is open to the public as a national park.

Shinjuku Gyoen

It provides a great resting place to escape from the hustle and bustle of city life.

Shinjuku Gyoen

The beautiful grounds have several major gardens including English Landscape, French Formal, Japanese Traditional (with teahouse), and the Mother and Child forest.

Shinjuku Gyoen

In late March and early April, cherry blossoms are in season but only for a short period of time.

Shinjuku Gyoen

Take a picnic lunch and rest in the grounds surrounded by nature.